Life Library — Death

 

Christmas Mourning — The holidays can be a time of sadness and loneliness, especially for those mourning the passing of a loved one. During the Christmas season, the baby Jesus’ gentle hand reaches out. In the end, He will take them by the hand and lead them into His joy and peace.

Comfort in the Face of Death — If you want to comfort a loved one who is dying, don’t pretend everything will be OK. Our comfort begins at the cross. We provide care to suffering people when we allow them their cries of forsakenness (see Psalm 22). We don’t have to pretty up dying with false hopes.

Comfort for Women Who Have Had a Miscarriage — “Writing with pastoral concern, Luther points out that the miscarriage … is not a sign of God’s anger … Luther sees the basis for Christian consolation in the unspoken prayers of the mother in which the Spirit is at work and which sanctify the child, and in the prayers of the Christian congregation.”

God is Not Done With YouThere are no human words that can take away the pain suffered by grieving mothers. For now, the best we can hope for is some way to endure. God, in His mercy, has provided a way.

He Knows Our Pain — God’s grace is sufficient, even for the sadness of a stillbirth.

If I Should Die — Everyone needs to be ready to die. Death can come suddenly. But if death may come without warning, is it still possible to prepare for it? Yes. The Christian has many avenues of preparation.

I Want to Burden My Loved Ones — We shouldn’t hesitate to empower our loved ones to make medical decisions for us as long as they avoid the futile question “What would he have wanted?” and content themselves with the question “What is best for him now?”

Medical Directives and Some Misunderstandings — Medical directives give directions in health care decision-making in anticipation of the possibility that the patient will be unable to do so in the future due to illness (coma, Alzheimer’s, etc.). There are two kinds: the Living Will and the Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care.

Prepared for Death — When we enter the working world in early adulthood, we begin to save for retirement, though it’s 50 years away. If we can be so concerned about our earthly future, why can’t we understand the necessity of preparing for death long before it comes?

Waiting for Death, Waiting for Christ — “And just as it is appointed for man to die once, andafter that comes judgment, so Christ, having been offered once to bear the sins of many, will appear a second time, not to deal with sin but to save those who are eagerly waiting for him” (Heb. 9:27-28).

We Believe in the Resurrection of the Body — My grandmother was created body and soul, every member lovingly created out of divine goodness and mercy by God our Father who took care of them (cf. Jer. 1:5, Ps. 139:13-14). The separation of her soul from her body is not good news. It is a big part of why death is our enemy.

What About ... Death and Dying — A reprint of a tract from The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod’s “What About …” series, this resource is intended to help us face death and understand what death is and how Christians face death and deal with grief.

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Lutherans Engage the World

Lutheran Engage the WorldEngaging the Church in the work of witness and mercy across the globe in our life together.

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The Lutheran Witness

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Concordia Publishing House

Concordia Publishing House