Racism

Racism


God’s love for this world (John 3:16) breaks down dividing walls between people (Eph. 2:13–16). As God’s children, Christians love their neighbor as God loves them (Luke 10:25–37).

The separation of people into nations, languages and groups is a result of the fall into sin (Gen. 11), and is one of the aspects of a broken creation God restored through the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. We eagerly await His coming when all will be one in Him (Rev. 7:9) as pleases Him, as He created us to be.

 

A Prayer for Peace

Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod President Rev. Dr. Matthew Harrison leads a prayer for peace among His people.

“You, O Lord, teach us to “love your neighbor as yourself” (Mark 12:31), and that my neighbor includes everyone I meet in my daily vocations, and specifically without regard to race (Luke 10:25–37).”

A Prayer for Peace in Our Nation

 

Condemning racism

The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod condemns racism and asks its members to combat it in the Church and in society, as recorded in eight convention resolutions:

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  • 1971 — Res. 9-32: To Encourage Christian Action to Combat Racism

    1973 — Res. 9-22: To Continue Efforts to Combat Racism

    1977 — Res 10-18A: To Make Every Effort to Eliminate Racism

    1979 — Res 4-11: To Reaffirm Efforts to Combat Racism

    1981 — Res 8-07: To Oppose Racism and Violence

    1983 — Res 3-09: To Clarify Position on Anti-Semitism

    1992 — Res 3-03: To Combat All Racism

    1995 — Res 2-05A: To Commend for Study the CTCR Document Racism and the Church

    As the 1992 resolution states, racism is contrary to God’s Word and a sin against Him. Synod by-law 2.3.1 (a) states:

    “It shall be the policy of the Synod to decline membership to congregations whose constitutions deny membership or other congregational privileges to any Christian because of race or ethnic origin.”

    These resolutions and the truth they reflect are accurate reflections of the teachings of Holy Scripture. The testimony of God’s Word presents humanity as united in the Fatherhood of God (Eph. 3:14–15) and His provision for all His creatures (Matt 5:45).

    Primary in His Fatherly divine goodness and mercy is the gift of His Son Jesus Christ as the sacrifice for the sins of the whole world (1 John 2:2).

 


 

Empowerment Center, including Lutheran Hope Center, opens at Ferguson’s ‘ground zero’

Lutheran Hope Center in Ferguson: Rev. Micah Glenn

The Ferguson Community Empowerment Center opened in July 2017, and it houses four St. Louis-area partners determined to restore the beleaguered community after violent protests in 2014 sparked a new look at racism nationwide.

The Rev. Micah Glenn, a Mission Field: USA national missionary, is based there as director of the Lutheran Hope Center, where volunteers offer Jesus' love along with education, mentoring and other assistance.

 Read Reporter Online story   TheLutheranHopeCenter.com

 


 

 

Resources

  Audio

  Articles

  Documents

  • Racism: A Christian Response — The Christian response to racism is centered in the Gospel of Jesus Christ and is shaped by clear Biblical principles.

 

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